Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Lexington Personal Injury Attorney

Mr. Vaught has included answers to some of the most commonly-asked questions regarding personal injury litigation and legal representation in injury cases.Please keep in mind that the answers to many of these questions will be dependent upon the unique circumstances of your particular case. For a more in-depth explanation of your injury case, please contact us and schedule your free consultation.

Will I be informed about the status of my case? How will I know what is happening?

Attorney James Vaught is dedicated to providing compassionate and effective legal guidance for all clients. Mr. Vaught knows that communication is important. While working on your case, he keeps his clients informed in ways that are convenient for you and with your permission, such as through telephone calls, letters, office meetings and/or text messages or email.

Can I make a claim for pain and suffering?

Yes, you are allowed to in many types of injury cases. Under Kentucky law, a claim for pain and suffering is available for many types of injury cases. Pain and suffering refers to the physical pain and mental and emotional suffering, including inconvenience and loss of enjoyment of life that an injured person may suffer due to an injury. To learn more about making a claim for pain and suffering, please click here.

How much money do I need to pay your firm up-front?

Attorney Vaught handles most personal injury cases on a contingent fee basis, which means that you will not need to pay anything up-front. In most injury cases, if there is no recovery, then you pay no attorney fee, and you are not responsible for case expenses (which are not attorney's fees). The contingent fee representation agreement will be provided, in writing, by Attorney James Vaught.

Will I recover money for my lost income?

It is possible to recover money for lost income; however, the chances of recovering lost income depends on many factors, including whether the responsible party has insurance, and whether the responsible party has the ability to pay the lost income that you have incurred. In some cases, car insurance, disability insurance, or workers' compensation insurance may provide lost income payments to the injured person soon after the injury occurs. For instance, after a car wreck, there can be Personal Injury Protection (PIP) benefits available to pay some or all lost wages, in some situations.

Time away from work and lost wages often follow an injury, and claims for lost income can be complex - often requiring documentation, such as pay stubs, work excuses, and medical opinions to support the lost time from work, work history, tax returns, and more. These can also include claims for loss of income in the past and loss of the ability to earn income in the future. Lost income claims depend on whether there is medical evidence of the inability to work. Each case is different, and attorney James Vaught can help you understand your rights, as well as help you discover the legal requirements involved in making a claim. To learn more about recovering money for lost wages, please click here.

How quickly should I talk to an attorney after an injury occurs?

Speaking with an attorney soon after an injury occurs helps the injured person get answers to her / his questions, understand her / his rights, and gives the injured person an opportunity to concentrate on healing while the attorney works on the injury case. When an attorney is hired soon after an injury occurs, it can give the attorney the advantage of additional opportunities to identify, document, and preserve important evidence, which can be lost as time passes. An attorney can help gather information necessary for making insurance claims, identify and explain legal rights, and determine whether there is any available insurance coverage.

Who will pay my medical bills?

Medical bills begin to accumulate soon after an injury occurs, including:

  • Emergency room care
  • Ambulance transportation
  • Medical testing such as X-Rays & CT scans
  • Medical procedures such as surgery
  • Physical therapy
  • Hospitalization
  • Medical devices such as hospital beds & splints
  • Medication
  • Pain management
  • Rehabilitation
  • Office visits with physicians, including specialists
  • Medical treatment in the future (future medical bills)

The responsible party or her / his insurance company does not often begin paying medical bills soon after an injury occurs. The injured party often must find a way to pay or deal with her / his medical bills until the injury case is resolved in court or by out-of-court settlement. Car insurance, such as PIP benefits, personal health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Passport and/or workers' compensation medical benefits are some of the ways that an injured person may find as a source of payment for medical bills, but each case is different. Attorney James Vaught is available to assist you with questions about payment of medical bills. He can help you identify the available sources for payment of medical bills. Call today for a no-obligation consultation. To learn more about being reimbursed for medical bills, please click here.

How much is my personal injury case going to be worth?

Unfortunately, there is no "one size fits all" answer to this question, as the value of your claim will be entirely dependent on the circumstances, such as the extent of your injuries, whether the injuries are temporary or permanent, the amount of lost wages, whether there is a reduction of the ability to earn income, physical pain, scarring, the harms related to the injury, as well as medical bills. In some cases, your recovery may be limited by how much the responsible party is able to pay and by the available amount of liability insurance.

Attorney Vaught is committed to his clients and will fight for you. To learn more, contact him today .